Bones, Blood, Barbers, and Butchers: Surgeons in the 18th Century

Dirty, Sexy History

In the eighteenth century, the record for the fastest amputation at the thigh was nine seconds, start to finish, including sawing through the bone. Are you impressed yet? Even the average, thirty seconds, was pretty damned fast.

And speed was of the essence. Let’s face it. If you needed surgery in the eighteenth century or the first half of the nineteenth, you’d better be strong and brave, because it wasn’t a doddle. Not for the surgeon, and not at all for the patient.

Patients faced three major killers

They’d solved one of the major issues that killed people who needed surgery, reinventing ligatures to tie off blood vessels so the patient didn’t bleed out on the table. Before the sixteenth century, they’d used cautery—burning—to seal any gushers, vastly adding to the pain. And, of course, closing up the wound as fast as possible helped.

And pain was the second issue…

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What the Scot Hears Has Arrived!!

Amy Quinton

It’s release day for What the Scot Hears!

I cannot believe it, and I cannot wait to hear what you all think.

What the Scot Hears is book 3 of my Agents of Change series and follows the love story of Lord Alaistair MacLeod, a private man and agent for the crown, and Mrs. Amelia Chase, an Amercian on the run from her past.

I hope you enjoy the book as much as I…it my favorite of the series!

The eBook is available for sale at most major retailers. The print book will be available in May.

SignatureWhat the Scot Hears

England 1814: She is an outspoken American with a questionable past and a dubious purpose. He is on the hunt for a traitor.

Mrs. Amelia Chase is a highly-opinionated American woman on the run from her past with a penchant for self-preservation and a healthy love for Shakespearean insults. She’s faced her…

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Caroline Warfield: The Reluctant Wife

Susana's Parlour

Map of Calcutta 1842, Government House to the left of the maidan

Government Houses

by Caroline Warfield

The Raj Bhavan, or Government House, dominates spacious grounds overlooking Calcutta’s maidan, a vast open park originally set aside for a military parade ground, in the vicinity of Fort William. Now the official residence of the Governor of West Bengal, its roots like deep in the history of English rule.

When Richard Wellesley, 1st Marquess Wellesley and older brother to the Duke of Wellington arrived in India as Governor General of Bengal in 1798 he discovered that his living quarters consisted of rented space on land formerly belonging to the Nawab of Chitpur. He found the situation unsuitable. Wellesley believed Bengal should be ruled from a palace, a visible seat of English power—and his own consequence. He initiated plans for such a structure soon after his arrival. The project would take over…

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Caroline Warfield: The Reluctant Wife

Amy Quinton

Happy Release Day! Caroline Warfield’s latest release, The Reluctant Wife, is available today!

The Reluctant WifeWhen all else fails, love succeeds…

Captain Fred Wheatly’s comfortable life on the fringes of Bengal comes crashing down around him when his mistress dies, leaving him with two children he never expected to have to raise. When he chooses justice over army regulations, he’s forced to resign his position, leaving him with no way to support his unexpected family. He’s already had enough failures in his life. The last thing he needs is an attractive, interfering woman bedeviling his steps, reminding him of his duties.

All widowed Clare Armbruster needs is her brother’s signature on a legal document to be free of her past. After a failed marriage, and still mourning the loss of a child, she’s had it up to her ears with the assumptions she doesn’t know how to take care of herself…

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